June 6, 2012

The vamp’s tendency to posture and her inclination to wear distinctive, vivid makeup combine to render her an excessively produced body. In some sense, she threatens to be out of bounds at any moment, and her body seems always to be in danger of showing. Her laboring efforts help her carry off a kind of masquerade—a false femininity whose veneer is continually slipping. The vamp’s meaning is also strongly articulated by means of costume. Heavily sexualized, her clothing tends to be dark in color or to feature aggressive prints and stripes that serve to mark her sartorial threat. The vamp draws attention to her labors through her costume, and so represents a sharp break with the patriarchal requirement that women’s labor be invisible. Since we are culturally committed to effacing the female laboring body, part of the threat of the vamp is that she presents herself as the evolving site of her own laboring efforts.
- Diane Negra, “Immigrant Stardom in Imperial America: Pola Negri and the Problem of Typology,” from A Feminist Reader in Early Cinema

Everything I’ve read so far from this anthology has been fantastic, but this article made me especially excited, for obvious reasons. (So excited that I’m actually posting on Tumblr again, whoa!)
Pictured: vamp queen Theda Bara.

The vamp’s tendency to posture and her inclination to wear distinctive, vivid makeup combine to render her an excessively produced body. In some sense, she threatens to be out of bounds at any moment, and her body seems always to be in danger of showing. Her laboring efforts help her carry off a kind of masquerade—a false femininity whose veneer is continually slipping. The vamp’s meaning is also strongly articulated by means of costume. Heavily sexualized, her clothing tends to be dark in color or to feature aggressive prints and stripes that serve to mark her sartorial threat. The vamp draws attention to her labors through her costume, and so represents a sharp break with the patriarchal requirement that women’s labor be invisible. Since we are culturally committed to effacing the female laboring body, part of the threat of the vamp is that she presents herself as the evolving site of her own laboring efforts.

- Diane Negra, “Immigrant Stardom in Imperial America: Pola Negri and the Problem of Typology,” from A Feminist Reader in Early Cinema

Everything I’ve read so far from this anthology has been fantastic, but this article made me especially excited, for obvious reasons. (So excited that I’m actually posting on Tumblr again, whoa!)

Pictured: vamp queen Theda Bara.

  1. teenageevangelism reblogged this from loveinexcess
  2. hector-andromache reblogged this from pornographers-handbook
  3. daisies-4-u reblogged this from disgusting-vomit
  4. disgusting-vomit reblogged this from pornographers-handbook
  5. dederants reblogged this from doltbelt
  6. doltbelt reblogged this from pornographers-handbook
  7. pornographers-handbook reblogged this from loveinexcess
  8. starlettohara reblogged this from loveinexcess
  9. thephlorescentleech reblogged this from loveinexcess
  10. lai-ika reblogged this from loveinexcess
  11. things-of-inspiration reblogged this from theloudestvoice
  12. otterschman reblogged this from labelleotero
  13. ozamataz-buckshank reblogged this from theholygirl
  14. lullabe reblogged this from loveinexcess
  15. dazedreflection reblogged this from mysparrowheart
  16. puurple-lip reblogged this from loveinexcess
  17. janeavrils reblogged this from makingandunmakingselves
  18. pearlaabsinthe reblogged this from theloudestvoice
  19. throughtheinvisible reblogged this from smallestmouse
  20. twinkleberrybabybushkin reblogged this from gypsypurpleloves
  21. east-side-story reblogged this from pickurselfup
  22. beautifulepoch reblogged this from pickurselfup
  23. pickurselfup reblogged this from theloudestvoice